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The IRS Deals A Blow To Inherited IRAs And This Could Be A Trap For Many

Up until 2019, IRA holders did not have to take money out of their IRAs – and pay taxes on those distributions – until they turned a certain age (which is currently 72 for those born after 1949) regardless of whether their IRAs were their own or inherited. Because of this, someone could name a beneficiary who was much younger – a grandchild, for example – and keep wealth untaxed for generations. This estate-planning technique was known as the “stretch IRA.”

7 Financial Tips For College Freshman

Most people go to college in order to better their lives and earn a degree that translates into the working world. On the flipside, parents and college kids may be rightfully stressed about the financial implications of pursuing higher education at a traditional college or university — particularly if they’re relying on student loans to pay for school.

9 Charts Every Investor Should See

Investing during periods of volatility can be difficult, especially when markets seem arbitrary.

11 Tax Deductions To Help Small Business Owners Minimize Their Taxes

Filing your taxes is one of the least exciting parts of owning your own business. However, your taxes on a small business can be extremely painful without proactive tax planning . Here are a few tax deductions that could help you keep more of your hard-earned money.

Keep a Lid on Social Security Taxes and Medicare Costs. Consider Roth IRA Conversions.

If you’ve become a 401(k) millionaire or amassed large sums in other tax-deferred retirement accounts, you can potentially shave your lifetime taxes by hundreds of thousands of dollars by converting part of it to a Roth IRA before you start collecting Social Security. But figuring out how much to convert—and when—is a tricky exercise.

Investors Know Little About ESG, a New Study Finds

Environmental, social, and governance, or ESG, investing is a hot trend, but retail investors are unfamiliar with the approach and have a hard time explaining what it means. About one in four people believes the acronym stands for “earnings, stock, growth,” according to a new study.

What You Need to Know About Marriage and Money

The spring wedding season is upon us. According to a survey by The Knot, there will be more weddings in the U.S. in 2022 than in any other year since 1984. And, on average, couples will spend $28,000 on their ceremony and reception, back in line with 2019 levels.

‘Nowhere to hide’ for investors in market turbulence

Fund managers have been tripped up by global stocks and bonds falling in tandem in the first quarter.

Retiring Early? Avoid The Early Penalty Tax

Many people are retiring early. The St. Louis Federal Reserve reported that upwards of 3 million Americans retired early due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Value Investing Is Back. But for How Long?

Value investing—buying stocks that are cheap on measures such as earnings or book value—is having a renaissance. Up to last Thursday, large value stocks beat more expensive “growth” stocks by the most of any 50-day period since the technology bubble burst in 2000-01, with the exception of the post-vaccine rebound early last year.

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